Republicans increase attack ad spend on LGBTQ+ video

The Maine Republican Party plans to increase spending on an attack ad directed at Democratic Gov. Janet Mills, its first television ad of the 2022 gubernatorial campaign. The focus is on a five-and-a-half-minute video made two years ago by Kailina Mills, a kindergarten teacher at Whitefield Elementary School, 11 miles from Augusta, and her discussion of transgender issues. video on the “freedom holiday”. “Some people, when they get a bit older, realize what the doctors said wasn’t right.” The teacher is not related to Governor Mills, according to her office. She has been employed in the Sheepscot Valley School District, RSU 12, for the past two years, Superintendent Howie Tuttle said. Tuttle said Mills created the video during her previous teaching job at Waterboro and it was not part of her district’s curriculum. -appropriate, citing a study published in 2020 by the ‘Journal of the American Medical Association’. .The video was one of more than 400 videos produced to supplement pandemic remote learning and posted online by the Maine Department of Education on its Maine Online Opportunities for Sustained Education (MOOSE) platform. ).Co Commissioner Pander Makin declined to be interviewed. The Maine Republican Party’s announcement highlights the total funding received by the department to create its video resource center. “Almost $2.8 million. That’s how much Governor Janet Mills spent from your tax dollars. To create radical school lessons,” the ad reads. Maine Republican Party Executive Director Jason Savage said in an interview: “If this is how $2.8 million in taxes was spent, on this subject, you have to ask yourself, ‘Where else has the money been wasted?'” As source of the spending figure, Savage pointed to a 79-page document from the Maine Department of Education outlining how he would spend federal coronavirus relief funds.Marcus Mrowka, director of communications for the Maine Department of Education, said participating teachers were paid $1,000 for the first quarter of work on their videos and $250 for each additional quarter Mrowka said the department did not track usage and received no complaints before the GOP announcement. , mo educational dules,” Mrowka said in an email, covering topics including history, reading and math, and computer science. Savage said class content is a decision for local school boards, including sex education. Savage said, “It’s something the average Mainer just doesn’t want to see introduced into the kindergarten classroom, and it showed the door was wide open for it.” Savage said the party has already bought $200,000 in TV and radio time – double its initial ad buy of $98,000 – and will increase very soon. The party’s gubernatorial candidate, former two-term governor Paul LePage, is unopposed in the Republican primary next month. don’t work on Paul LePage’s failed record, so they resort to following a national playbook that seeks to distract, distort and divide,” Maine Democratic Party Chairman Drew Gattine said in a written statement. . “The people of Maine know better than to believe the lies of the Maine GOP and recognize that Governor Mills is a champion of Maine’s tradition of local control, for our children, for our teachers, for our schools and for our LGBTQ+ community. . Under his leadership, Maine finally fully funded the state’s share of public education, raised teachers’ salaries to a living wage, and expanded learning opportunities from kindergarten through college. Mrowka wrote, “A review of the video led the department to conclude that the lesson is not something we would recommend including as part of kindergarten instruction.” Governor Mills agreed with this decision. “The Governor was unaware of the lesson in MOOSE, but she understands the concerns expressed about age appropriateness,” Lindsay Crete, spokeswoman for Governor Mills, said in an email. “Ultimately, decisions about what is taught in a classroom are made by – and always will be made by – parents, community members, teachers and elected local school boards, in keeping with the long tradition of local control She will continue to empower parents and elected school boards to make decisions about their children’s education, and she will continue to respect LGBTQ+ people as valued members of the Maine community. libbed by the teacher, or if an administrator had verified it. Savage said: “The Department of Education says they didn’t approve it. I don’t understand how this ended up on their website without them reviewing it.” Teacher Kailina Mills said on Facebook, “The most disappointing part of this is that the Ministry of Maine Education (MDOE) and the Mills administration bowed to pressure. instead of standing up for some of Maine’s most vulnerable individuals, families, and students.

The Maine Republican Party plans to increase spending on an attack ad directed at Democratic Gov. Janet Mills, its first television ad of the 2022 gubernatorial campaign.

The focus is on a five and a half minute track made two years ago by Kailina Millsa kindergarten teacher at Whitefield Elementary School, 11 miles from Augusta, and her discussion of transgender issues.

“The T stands for transgender. A transgender person is someone who was mistaken by doctors when they were born,” the teacher said in the “freedom vacation” video. “Some people, when they get a bit older, realize what the doctors said wasn’t right.”

The teacher is not related to Governor Mills, according to her office.

She worked in the Sheepscot Valley School District, USR 12over the past two years, Superintendent Howie Tuttle said.

Tuttle said Mills created the video during her previous teaching job at Waterboro and it was not part of her district’s curriculum.

Mills did not respond to messages but said on facebook she thought the discussion was age-appropriate, citing a study a 2020 study published by the ‘Journal of the American Medical Association.’

“Nearly all of the transgender people involved in the study experienced gender dysphoria by age 7,” Mills, who holds a master’s degree in early childhood education, wrote.

The video was one of more than 400 produced to supplement remote pandemic learning and published online by the Maine Department of Education on his Maine Online Opportunities for Sustained Education (MOOSE) Platform.

Commissioner Pander Makin declined to be interviewed.

The Maine Republican Party announcement highlights the total funding the department received to create its Video Resource Center.

“Almost $2.8 million. That’s what Governor Janet Mills spent of your tax dollars. To create radical lessons,” the ad reads.

Maine Republican Party Executive Director Jason Savage said in an interview, “If that’s how $2.8 million in taxes was spent on that, you have to ask yourself, ‘Where is it? ‘other was the money wasted?'”

As a source of the expense amount, Savage indicated a 79-page document from the Maine Department of Education outlining how it would spend federal coronavirus relief funds.

Marcus Mrowka, director of communications for the Maine Department of Education, said participating teachers were paid $1,000 for the first quarter of work on their videos and $250 for each additional quarter.

Mrowka said the department did not track usage and received no complaints prior to the GOP announcement.

“MOOSE is not a program; it’s a collection of stand-alone educational modules,” Mrowka said in an email, covering topics including history, reading and math, and computer science.

Savage said classroom content is a decision of local school boards, including sex education and transgender issues.

Savage said, “It’s something the average Mainer just doesn’t want to see introduced into the kindergarten classroom, and it showed the door was wide open for it.”

Savage said the party has already purchased $200,000 in television and radio time — double its original ad buy of $98,000 — and will increase very soon.

The party’s gubernatorial candidate, former two-term governor Paul LePage, is unopposed in the Republican primary next month.

“The Maine GOP knows it can’t run on Paul LePage’s failed record, so it’s resorting to a national playbook that seeks to distract, distort and divide,” the Maine Democratic Party chairman said. , Drew Gattine, in a written statement. “Maine people know better than to believe the lies of the Maine GOP and recognize that Governor Mills is a champion of Maine’s tradition of local control, for our children, for our teachers, for our schools, and for our LGBTQ+ community. Under his leadership, Maine finally fully funded the state’s share of public education, raised teachers’ salaries to a living wage, and expanded learning opportunities from kindergarten through college.

The Ministry of Education removed the video from its website after the announcement aired.

Mrowka wrote, “A review of the video led the department to conclude that the lesson is not something we would recommend including as part of kindergarten instruction.”

Governor Mills accepted this decision.

“The Governor was unaware of MOOSE’s lesson, but she understands the concerns expressed regarding age appropriateness,” Lindsay Crete, spokeswoman for Governor Mills, said in an email. “Ultimately, decisions about what is taught in a classroom are made by – and always will be made by – parents, community members, teachers and elected local school boards, consistent with the long Maine’s tradition of local control. She will continue to empower parents and elected school boards to make decisions about their children’s education, and she will continue to respect LGBTQ+ people as valued members of the Maine community.

The department declined to say what age is appropriate for the LGBTQ+ content, whether it approved the lesson, whether the video was scripted or improvised by the teacher, or whether an administrator vetted it.

Savage said, “The Department of Education claims they didn’t approve it. I don’t understand how it ended up on their website without them reviewing it.”

Teacher Kailina Mills said on Facebook, “The most disappointing part of it all is that the Maine Department of Education (MDOE) and Mills administration bowed to pressure instead of standing up for some of the people. , families and most vulnerable students in Maine. .”

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